elisemag:

Like most of you (i’m guessing), i wanted to go to Coachella more than anything! i mean did you see the line up? But instead of prancing around in a flower crown and rocking face paint, i’m in my pjs. But just because were not at Coachella doesn’t mean, we can’t pretend! So here are a couple, at home No-chella things you can do!
watch a Live stream of the Performances  {here} & {here}

although you can be there look at the bright side, you can see your favorite band preform without overheating in the sun and being attacked by bugs!

 listen to our No-Chella Playlist {here pt.1} {here pt.2}

this is a playlist of one song from (almost) every single performer at Coachella, it’s like a Coachella Salad!

make some cute diys {here}

we have loads of adorable diys from flower crowns, flowerpot necklaces, and picnic kits.

Invite some friends over and dress like fairies, live stream Coachella, make the diys & instagram that shit! 
Have a Great Time not being at Coachella, like me,
-Molly
p.s. please don’t delete text! 

elisemag:

Like most of you (i’m guessing), i wanted to go to Coachella more than anything! i mean did you see the line up? But instead of prancing around in a flower crown and rocking face paint, i’m in my pjs. But just because were not at Coachella doesn’t mean, we can’t pretend! So here are a couple, at home No-chella things you can do!

watch a Live stream of the Performances  {here} & {here}

although you can be there look at the bright side, you can see your favorite band preform without overheating in the sun and being attacked by bugs!

 listen to our No-Chella Playlist {here pt.1} {here pt.2}

this is a playlist of one song from (almost) every single performer at Coachella, it’s like a Coachella Salad!

make some cute diys {here}

we have loads of adorable diys from flower crowns, flowerpot necklaces, and picnic kits.

Invite some friends over and dress like fairies, live stream Coachella, make the diys & instagram that shit! 

Have a Great Time not being at Coachella, like me,

-Molly

p.s. please don’t delete text! 

@2 hours ago with 80 notes

lapfoxs:

this is literally everyone on tumblr

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@3 hours ago with 455780 notes
ridge:

skkrrrttttt BACK the fuck up

ridge:

skkrrrttttt BACK the fuck up

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@17 hours ago with 19364 notes
@18 hours ago with 227663 notes
bigloag:

If my ears don’t bleed…it’s not fuckin loud enough!

bigloag:

If my ears don’t bleed…it’s not fuckin loud enough!

@18 hours ago with 11 notes

dietcrush:

you’re kinda cool

you’re…

image

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@3 hours ago with 93075 notes
@3 hours ago with 131703 notes
@18 hours ago with 87946 notes

the-real-goddamazon:

thechroniclesoflee:

sixpenceee:

First of all, that first statement is an overgeneralization. Not every Chinese person is going to be skilled at math of course. It’s ignorant to go into these stereotypes. 

But try this:

4,8,5,3,9,7,6.

Read them out loud to yourself. Now look away, and spend twenty seconds memorizing that sequence before saying them out loud again.

If you speak English, you have about a 50 percent chance of remembering that sequence perfectly If you’re Chinese, though, you’re almost certain to get it right every time. 

Why is this? 

One explanation is because the Chinese language allows them to read numbers faster. 

Chinese number words are remarkably brief. Most of them can be said in less than 1/4th of a second (for instance, 4 is ‘si’ and 7 ‘qi’)

Their English equivalents—”four,” “seven”—are longer: pronouncing them takes about 1/3 of a second. 

The English number system is also VERY illogical. 

For example, right after the word 10, instead of saying one-ten, two-ten, three-ten we have different words like 11,12. 

Not so in China, Japan and Korea. They have a logical counting system. Eleven is ten one. Twelve is ten two. Twenty-four is two ten four, and so on.

That difference means that Asian children learn to count much faster. Four year old Chinese children can count, on average, up to forty. American children, at that age, can only count to fifteen, and don’t reach forty until they’re 5 years old.

The regularity of their number systems also means that Asian children can perform basic functions—like addition—far more easily.

Ask an English seven-year-old to add thirty-seven plus twenty two, in her head, and she has to convert the words to numbers (37 + 22).

 Ask an Asian child to add three-tens-seven and two tens-two, and no translation is necessary. 

SOURCE: X

MORE POSTS LIKE THIS: X

Huh. That’s really interesting!

This makes so much more sense than the racist bullshit people come up with.

(via thisislivingproof)

@18 hours ago with 57590 notes

pez-dispenser69:

Mmph these are just a few of my favorite things! Hmmm needs more Vic.

@18 hours ago with 19 notes